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HELP WANTED WITH RESEARCH
Q: Research on Occupational Therapy
Hi Julie,
My name is Ruth and I'm a Senior in High School. I'm researching a complete description of this career. But there is one question that has not yet been answered. My question is how does physics apply to this career?
Thank you so much for taking the time to read my question.

Ruth

A: Hi Ruth,

First look at the definition of physics:
-natural philosophy, the science, art or practice of medicine, anything healing or wholesome, a medicine, a cathartic.

Secondly look at what OT's do:
- we study medicine, surgery and psychiatry.
- we treat and therefore try to heal either by:
........improving function
........improving level of abilities
........we treat by analysing what is wrong then trying to correct this

Thirdly apply this to your answer to your question

Good luck in your assignment
 
  
Q: roles of personnel
hello there,
the next part of my O.T. coursework is explaining the staffing structure and the roles of the personnel. i have found out the job titles but am unaware of some of the roles. these are:
*Manager of Allied Health Professionals
*Manager of Service ~ Head 1
*Team Leaders ~ Head 3/4
*Senior 1/2
Thank you for any information given.
jennie

A: Look at careers information and some job advertisements (try jobcentre plus site and do a search) and you will find the difference. Senior 1/Head 4 are same pay scale. All the posts have some form of staff supervision and the post title depends on the number of staff supervised. A bit of research on your part will uncover the exact number.

The exception is the Senior I title as this is also a post for a specialist clinical area often if the person is working single handed i.e. without direct supervision. (Normally accessed by a senior 11 post.

e.g. SENIOR 1 POST ON JOBCENTRE SITE
Applicants must have broad based post registration experience and have been a Senior 11 for at least 2 years. Workload predominantly with Orthopaedic and Neurological patients. You will participate in the multi disciplinary assessment of patients in the Accident & Emergency Department. 36 hours per week.

Have you looked into the new consultant roles (for persons with great clinical expertise and research input)?

 
  
Q: Shortages
hello there,

Thank you for my current reply on professional bodies. the information was very useful.

The next question I have is based on 'current and anticipated skills shortages'. I am aiming to find out if any, what are the figures for shortages occupational therapists and the anticipated shortages in the future. how will this relate to the accuracy of skills and therefore have a knock-on effect of the clients?

Thank you for your time
jennie

A: The first part of your question is one I looked into when I started up in
Private Practice 10 years ago to see if there was a need for more private
OT's. I do not have any up-to date facts and figures but suggest you look, as I did, at any statistical information you can find. The NHS, Social Services and College of Occupational Therapy web sites may have some statistics for you on shortages (this method was not available 10 years ago!).

The last time I looked into this was a few years ago and 20% shortfall was predicted. If you then look at the number of OT's in training you will find the anticipated shortfall - remember to include 'drop-out' rates. I remember reading an article many years ago that researched into the working life of an OT and found the average was 2 years!!! There may be an up to date article on this in the OT journal.

You will need to look fairly wide at articles on OT (Community
Care / Social Work today back copies may have some useful material).

There is an interesting American case on the web concerning faillure to provide OT during staff shortages at: http://www.ibwebs.com/cliepviolation.htm

The parents of a six-year-old child with cerebral palsy and global delays alleged that the district failed to provide occupational therapy (OT) services pursuant to the child's IEP. The district maintained that a suspension of OT services had been unavoidable due to a shortage of qualified OT professionals. During the suspension, the parents independently located a qualified OT professional, but the district refused to contract with the therapist, contending that all OT services would be rationed on a priority basis, and not according to the needs of individual children. After two months, the district employed a qualified OT professional and resumed provision of OT services to the child.

HELD: for the parents.

The administrative law judge (ALJ) held that the district's prioritizing of OT needs was not a proper exercise of its discretionary authority in providing services, where the child was denied necessary OT services for a period of several weeks, and where the district refused to contract with any private OT professionals during the period until the personnel shortage was remedied. Thus, for the two months when services were suspended, the district violated the IDEA by failing to provide OT services as required by the child's IEP, and the ALJ ordered the district to compensate the child with additional, weekly OT sessions.

Administrative Law Judge: James Stephen King.

Let me know of your findings and I will publish it for you on this page as I am planning a mini-thesis page.

 
  
Q: Professional bodies within Occupational Therapy

i am currently studying my second year in health and social care at pontefract New College. i am devising a project based on Occupational therapists and their roles within different settings.
one of my tasks is to collect information connected to the role and influence of professional bodies on qualifications and experience. i am wondering if you have any information on this or any links connected to the question?

thankyou

jennie

A: Jennie,

All practising OT's are state registered and have completed either a diploma or degree in OT. Both the Health Professions Council (HPC) and the College of Occupational Therapy Ltd (COT) are 2 good places to start collecting information connected to your project.

1. The Health Professions Council is a new, independent, UK-wide regulatory body which has been set-up to regulate the following 12 health professions: arts therapists, chiropodists/podiatrists, clinical scientists, dietitians, medical laboratory scientific officers (MLSOs), occupational therapists, orthoptists, prosthetists & orthotists, paramedics, physiotherapists, radiographers and speech & language therapists.

The Health Professions Council
Park House
184 Kennington Park Road
London, SE11 4BU
UK
[t] +44 (0) 20 7582 0866
[f] +44 (0) 20 7820 9684
www.hpcuk.org
There is a specific link on OT on the HPC site.
www.hpcuk.org/docs/profession_occupational.htm

2. The COT has an Education and Practice Section on 020 7450 2318.

3. Another source is the college of occupational therapy centres in the UK. Refer to the COT website for details of your nearest centre.

4. A large number of OT's work in Social Services so it may be worth contacting the General Social Care Council as they set standards for social workers.

Good luck with your project.
 
  
Q: research on disabled access

Dear Sir / Madam

I would be most grateful for any assistance you may be able to provide as I am researching the effects of the Disability Discrimination Act 1995, which you probably know comes into force in 2004.

My aim is to compile a report outlining a forecast budget for service providers through auditing various types of buildings. I hope to identify the most reasonable course of action, in order to make buildings more accessible for the disabled in the future.

I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Thank you

Philipos Charalambous

A: (If other 'surfers' can help then please send a reply via philipos@julieswann.com and I will forward the information onto Philipos Charalambous).
......................................................................
Hi

I'm an OT employed by a Local Authority Housing Dept in London, and although housing as such is not covered under the DDA, I've also just completed training as an Access Auditor.

Just a short note for G Dickenson to say that Part M is very limited in scope. They should also be considering BS8300:2001 'Design of Buildings and their approaches to meet the needs of disabled people'. This document goes into much more detail and is intended as the basis for the extended Code of Practice of the DDA. This Code of Practice was published in Feb 2002 by the Disability Rights Commision and is a Statutory Code, therefore will be referred to as guidance in the court. The DRC website is a very useful resource with case studies and publications advising service providers etc of best practice regarding the DDA part III

www.drc-gb.org Code of Practice covering Part III of the DDA: Rights of Access - Goods, Facilities, Services and Premises.

Other useful sites are the Centre for Accessible Environments www.cae.org.uk and, Philipos Charalambous may find this useful, www.nrac.org.uk - this is the website of the National Register of Access Consultants.

Regards

neil



 
  
Q: I am currently conducting research for my dissertation this year at university and was wondering if you could assist me in any way with regards to my chosen subject. I am researching disabled living, with a view to lifetime homes, house adaptations and also to Part M of the Approved Document. I was wondering if you have any information, guidance notes, contacts, trade literature etc which could assist me in my research. If you have any information which may be of assistance could you please forward it to my email address:

G Dickson

A: I will forward some information to you when I collate it, meantime look into Architects designing for the disabled e.g. books by Selwyn Goldsmith, your local council staff who help design disabled living and the college of OT web site (www.cot.co.uk).
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Take a look at:

JOSEPH ROUNDTREE TRUST ON LINE www.jrf.org.uk/housingtrust. This site has an excellent section on Lifetime Housing with a discussion on Part M of the building regulations.
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(If other 'surfers' can help then please send a reply via dickson@julieswann.com and I will forward the information onto G Dickson).
........................................................................
Hi

I'm an OT employed by a Local Authority Housing Dept in London, and although housing as such is not covered under the DDA, I've also just completed training as an Access Auditor.

Just a short note for G Dickenson to say that Part M is very limited in scope. They should also be considering BS8300:2001 'Design of Buildings and their approaches to meet the needs of disabled people'. This document goes into much more detail and is intended as the basis for the extended Code of Practice of the DDA. This Code of Practice was published in Feb 2002 by the Disability Rights Commision and is a Statutory Code, therefore will be referred to as guidance in the court. The DRC website is a very useful resource with case studies and publications advising service providers etc of best practice regarding the DDA part III

www.drc-gb.org Code of Practice covering Part III of the DDA: Rights of Access - Goods, Facilities, Services and Premises.

Other useful sites are the Centre for Accessible Environments www.cae.org.uk and, Philipos Charalambous may find this useful, www.nrac.org.uk - this is the website of the National Register of Access Consultants.

Regards

neil